Online resources for research

Hello all. It’s been a while again, since my last blog post, and I apologize for the absence. I’ve been presenting to English classes as they prepare for their research projects. I generally start by introducing the HHS OPAC so that our students will know how to get around their college libraries once they get there, and then I ask them where they start their online searching. Without fail, every class has mentioned Google and Wikipedia. Then our real discussion begins. Depending on the topics, grade level, and amount of research the teachers are expecting of the students, we discuss different strategies, online tools and databases to use. Everyone gets introduced to the Haverhill Public Library databases and I reinforce the importance of having a library card.

But no matter how much I stress the value of databases, I still see students returning to the internet to complete their academic research; and I don’t blame them. There are many wonderful and useful sites out there, and today I’d like to share with you a short list of my favorite online tools and websites for doing academic work and research:

  • CIA World Factbook: An indispensible collection of intelligence gathered from countries around the world including the best, most current data on population, economics, religion and other social and financial information.
  • Newseum: Part curiosity, part digital archive, the collection at this website is interesting for a couple of reasons. First of all, you can see the front page of over 1000 newspapers (yes, they still print those) from 89 countries. Second, you can see the front pages as they appeared on a few recent historic days (think 9/11, Katrina, final shuttle launch, 2004 Tsunami, etc). Third, there are also a number of professional development opportunities that teach how to incorporate the news in the classroom such as “The Photographic Revolution: The Ethics and Impact of Seeing the Story” and “The Media and the Cold War”.
  • Bartleby.com: No relation to Melville’s scrivener, this website is one of the original and best compilations of “classics”. Here you will find Bartlett’s Quotations, Bulfinch’s Mythology, Oxford’s Shakespeare, and other reference works including anthologies of TS Eliot, Sigmund Freud, Emily Dickinson & others.
  • Getty Images: I haven’t completely explored this website, but I do know that there are more than 3 million pictures available and that makes for a fantastic resource for any project. Unfortunately, you can’t save the pictures without purchasing them (unless you don’t mind a large watermark crediting the photographer … which sometimes, I don’t). Even if you don’t include the pictures in your paper or presentation, the photographs in this collection are still useful for looking at primary documents from different periods to examine fashion, architecture, living conditions, etc.
  • Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab): a great resource for anyone who is writing a research or academic paper of any kind. For me, this site basically replaces my old desktop, spiral bound copy of Diane Hacker’s Writers Handbook. Whenever I teach academic writing I always use the sample papers available on the site to show students what a paper should “look like” … presentation counts, after all.
  • PaperRater: Sure, whatever word processing program you’re using already has a built-in spell correct and grammar check feature, but this web site offers just a little bit more than that. PaperRater tells you up front that it can’t tell you a lick about your content, but it is pretty good at looking at things it can quantify, like sentence length and words per sentence. It can also make some guesses about your writing by looking at your vocabulary, capitalization, and punctuation. That’s really good feedback for free.

This is by no means a complete or comprehensive list of all the resources available online for doing research, but it’s a start, and I hope you find something useful. Thank you for stopping by.

Copyright © henry toromoreno, 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

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About htwilson

born in brooklyn, raised in queens, massachusetts, that's where I be.
This entry was posted in Favorite Sites, recommendations and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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